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The Family Partnership Accreditation Has Been Renewed by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)

Published on August 23, 2017  |  Written by Willie Roller

August 22, 2017 – MINNEAPOLIS – The Family Partnership accreditation has been renewed by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).

The Family Partnership recently completed a program review, and its accreditation has been renewed by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Accreditation of Early Learning Programs. “The criteria for accreditation helps to ensure a quality daily experience for our young students at Four Directions Family Center and demonstrates our commitment to the best practices and standards for addressing the needs of young children,” said Molly Greenman, President and CEO, The Family Partnership.

“I want to thank our staff who work so hard to exceed expectations for our families,” said Greenman. “NAEYC accreditation is really the gold standard of evaluation for child care centers, and we remain accredited year over year, for the last 16 years.”

The Family Partnership is delivering with results, too. Diane Seurer, Program Director at Four Directions Family Center said that 92% of the children who graduated from The Family Partnership’s nationally accredited multicultural therapeutic preschools tested ready for kindergarten, and 75% of the children enrolled tested positive the having the necessary skills for their age group.

Greenman emphasized the increasing need for support for families with young children, especially those with few “reserves” for dealing with adversity.

Research has shown that experiences in the first three years of life strongly influence the physical architecture of the brain. Because one of the most important elements of that foundation is positive interaction between parent and child, The Family Partnership works closely with both generations. Teachers and childcare workers support parents through personal coaching to support parents and help them sustain their children’s educational progress at home. They also partner with other community resources to address children’s health and dental care, transportation, and basic needs.

The biggest threat to positive parent-child interactions is toxic stress: abuse, neglect, addiction, mental illness, and chronic poverty, explained Greenman. She said The Family Partnership is uniquely equipped to respond to these issues, with an expertise in mental health and early childhood education. And, the agency’s commitment to a two-generation approach leverages partnerships with other local agencies to increase opportunities for parents to get and keep a job, earn a higher wage, and get an education. “It is not simply about providing quality childcare for families who need it, it is about developing solutions to promote prosperity, so we can ultimately break intergenerational poverty,” she said.

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